Holiday Resort

‘Aldborough…that fashionable and much-frequented watering-place’

In the opening years of the 19th century visitors began to come to Aldeburgh to enjoy its ‘clear and healthy’ air and to sample ‘the excellence of its water’. The Guide Book assures its readers that Aldeburgh ‘…is reckoned by physicians to be one of the most healthy places along the eastern shore, and as remarkable for repeated instances of longevity.’ As well as grand hotels, there were some fifteen lodging houses in 1820 not to mention about fifty houses which were ‘wholly or in part appropriated for the accommodation of strangers’ and ‘charging generally seven shillings per week for each room’.

The Esplanade 1867The Esplanade; a fashionable promenade

 

The Guide Book opens: The prevailing taste of the day is to visit a Watering Place….Here the youth of both sexes exhibit their charms; the result is, some may catch a fortune, and some spend one. Some go for amusement, and some for gambling. The doctor sends his patients to the waters to prevent the disgrace of killing them. But the two leading motives are PLEASURE and HEALTH.’

The White LionThe White Lion Hotel; by Thomas Churchyard

In 1860 the White Lion was the principal hotel and one of the oldest. In this print it extends much too far north of the Moot Hall but it can clearly be seen that there is no sign of building beyond it.

 

A young lady paints the view from her bedroom at the end of October 1863. Those red turrets are the northern end of the White Lion Hotel.

A young lady paints the view from her bedroom at the end of October 1863. Those red turrets are the northern end of the White Lion Hotel.



Wentworth Terrace By 1869 the Wentworth Terrace and North Lodge have joined the White Lion. Wentworth Castle HotelThen North Lodge was converted into the Wentworth Castle Hotel which opened in 1900 and was soon attracting many fashionable visitors.